Jon Kyl

United States Senator for Arizona

About Senator Kyl

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Senator Jon Kyl – Biography

Jon Kyl was appointed as U.S. Senator for the state of Arizona by Governor Doug Ducey on September 5, 2018. He currently serves on the Senate Armed Services Committee, the Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee and the Indian Affairs Committee.

Prior to his appointment, Senator Kyl served eighteen years in the U.S. Senate and eight years in the U.S. House of Representatives. He was elected unanimously by his colleagues in 2008 to serve as Republican Whip, the second-highest position in the Senate Republican leadership, a position he held until his retirement in 2013.

Following his retirement from the Senate, Senator Kyl served as Senior of Counsel at Covington and Burling, LLP and was a Visiting Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. He was also a Distinguished Fellow in Public Service in Arizona State University’s College of Public Service and Community Solutions, a Distinguished Scholar of the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, and a director of the Kyl Center for Water Policy.

Before his public service, Senator Kyl practiced law at Jennings, Strouss & Salmon in Phoenix. In 1985, he served as chairman of the Phoenix Chamber of Commerce.

Born in Oakland, Nebraska, Senator Kyl received both his bachelor’s and law degrees from the University of Arizona. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa and was editor-in-chief of the Arizona Law Review. He and his wife Caryll have two children, Kristine Kyl Gavin and John Kyl, and four grandchildren.

Committee Assignments

 
The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nation's military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other matters related to defense policy. The Armed Services Committee was created as a result of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 following U.S. victory in the Second World War. It merged the responsibilities of the Committee on Naval Affairs (established in 1816) and the Committee on Military Affairs (also established in 1816). Considered one of the most powerful Senate committees, its broad mandate allowed it to report some of the most extensive and revolutionary legislation during the Cold War years, including the National Security Act of 1947.
 CommitteeWebsite
The United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs is the chief oversight committee of the United States Senate. It has jurisdiction over matters related to the Department of Homeland Security and other homeland security concerns, as well as the functioning of the government itself, including the National Archives, budget and accounting measures other than appropriations, the Census, the federal civil service, the affairs of the District of Columbia, and the United States Postal Service. The committee had been called the United States Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs before homeland security was added to its responsibilities in 2004.[1]The committee serves as the Senate's chief investigative and oversight committee. The chair of the committee is the only committee chair in the Senate with the power to issue subpoenas without a committee vote, though in practice, such unilateral subpoenas have rarely been issued in recent years.
 CommitteeWebsite

The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs has jurisdiction to study the unique problems of American Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native peoples and to propose legislation to alleviate these difficulties. These issues include, but are not limited to, Indian education, economic development, land management, trust responsibilities, health care, and claims against the United States.  All legislation proposed by Members of the Senate that specifically pertains to American Indians, Native Hawaiians, or Alaska Natives is under the jurisdiction of the Committee.
 CommitteeWebsite

 

Washington, D.C. Office

Russell 218 Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
Phone: (202) 224-2235

Phoenix Office

2201 E. Camelback Road,
Suite 115
Phoenix, AZ 85016
Phone: (602) 952-2410

Tucson Office

407 West Congress Street, Suite 103
Tucson, AZ 85710
Phone: (520) 670-6334